April Median Home Prices on the Increase

Great News for the Sacramento area real estate market.  April, 2013 Home Sales Prices are on the increase.  Check on detailed information in this article in the Sacramento Bee:

Sacramento County‘s median home resale price up nearly one-third

Published: Thursday, May. 16, 2013 – 12:00 am | Page 6B
Last Modified: Thursday, May. 16, 2013 – 7:53 am

In Sacramento County, the median price of detached resale homes rose by nearly a third in April compared with the same month a year before, DataQuick reported Wednesday.

The median price of resale homes in El Dorado County jumped by about 33 percent last month compared with April 2012. Placer and Yolo counties also experienced double-digit percentage gains, the San Diego-based real estate information service said.

“These eye-popping increases in medians remain a function of two things: home values going up because a lot of people are trying to buy in a supply-constrained market … and we’re seeing a lot more move-up activity,” said DataQuick analyst Andrew LePage.

The median is the price at which half of houses sell for more and half sell for less. Factors that influence it include the mix of homes sold.

Last year at this time, investors snapping up foreclosures dominated the region’s market. Today, foreclosure sales have plummeted and traditional buyers account for the majority of the open market, with many buying pricier move-up homes.

Sales of Sacramento County homes in the $300,000 to $800,000 range nearly doubled in April compared with the same month a year ago, while the number of homes that sold for less than $200,000 dropped by 26.5 percent, LePage said.

Median prices in all four counties also rose from March to April. In Sacramento County, for instance, the median sale price for detached single-family homes went from $162,000 in April 2012 to $208,000 in March to $215,000 last month.

Sales volume has also been picking up across the region, though the number of homes on the market remains at historic lows. Last month, the number of resale homes bought in Placer County was the most for any April since 2005, near the peak of the housing boom.

Call The Bee’s Hudson Sangree, (916) 321-1191.

Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/2013/05/16/5424557/sacramento-countys-median-home.html#storylink=cpy

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HUD-Owned Homes Expected to Increase

The following article appeared in REALTOR Magazine on April 30, 2013:

HUD-Owned Homes Expected to Surge

Daily Real Estate News | Tuesday, April 30, 2013

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is reportedly going to be releasing more of its homes to the market, which could be welcome news to buyers who have faced slim pickings in for-sale inventories.

Over the next two years, experts predict that HUD homes on the market will increase significantly as lenders work through the backlogs of foreclosures and foreclosure reviews.

“The inventory is there, [it’s] just not being released during the banks/servicers review of the loan/mortgage documents,” says Nat Genis, a HUD listing broker in Riverside County, Calif., which is already seeing an increase in HUD-owned homes.

“HUD homes are back,” Genis told HousingWire. “FHA financing went away with the ‘creative’ financing of the 80/20 loans, and now with the increase of FHA financing, these government-backed loans guarantee that if the borrower defaults, HUD will pay off the mortgage, obtain the deed, and re-sell the home.”

HUD-owned homes can be appealing because of the discounted sales price, even though they can be in poor condition often times, HousingWire reports.

HUD had 39,442 homes in its REO inventory nationwide as of Feb. 28, 2013—with 20,536 of those having pending contracts on them, according to HUD.

SOURCE: Housingwire (04/29/13)

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February 2013 Homes Prices Up 22.6% in One Year

Due to the low inventory of homes available, home buyers are willing to spend more on a home, that is if they can find one to buy.   The  Sacramento area’s resale home inventory is still very low.  This time last year there were 1,766 homes sold in February 2012 compared to 1,566 sold in February, 2013.  This is an 11.3% drop in sold homes.   This has caused the rapid increase in home prices.  Sacramento’s median price for February 2013 is $192,500, Placer County $298,500, El Dorado County $283,250 and Yolo County $250,000.  New home sales are also on the increase with 104 closings in Sacramento, 86 in Placer and 14 in Yolo County in the month of February.

 

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Is Cash still King??

We are in the middle of a crazy real estate market the Greater Sacramento area.  First time home buyers are being outbid by Cash Investors and Cash Buyers.    It is not uncommon to write over 10 offers for a first time home buyer in this market and sometimes still not get a home.  FHA home buyers are constantly being out bid due to the fact that they don’t have the necessary funds to pay more than the appraised value of the home and conventional buyers and cash buyers are purchasing the homes.

With this recent lack of inventory, the cash buyers are now being outbid by other cash buyers and we have seen homes selling for $20,000 over the list price.   Everyone is scrambling to find the deals only to find out that ship may have already sailed.

With spring a few month’s away and home prices on the increase, we should see more inventory coming on the market and some sellers with enough equity to move up in the market (an area we haven’t seen for many years).

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Sacramento Homes Prices on the Rise

Sacramento is suffering from lack of inventory for sale.  Due to the lack of available homes, the home prices in December, 2012 are on the rise.

Figures released by DataQuick show that the median home prices in Sacramento County rose 18% in December compared to December, 2011 from $155,000 to $183,000.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sacramento Housing Market Home Prices on the Rise

The numbers are in and Sacramento’s Housing Market continues to heat up!  In November the average Price per Square Foot hit a new high of $135.8, this was a 2.2% increase over last month and a 16% increase over the last year.  This increase can clearly be traced to the lower inventory numbers that continue to drive prices up.  The number of homes for sale decreased by-10% from last month and is down by over -52% from last year.  Another effect of this lower inventory is that houses are selling faster than we have seen in a long time, the average Days on Market for a home in the Sacramento Region dropped again to only 48 days!

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Home Equity back on the Rise

Sacramento area homes on the increase, don’t miss this great article:
sacbee.com
Sacramento’s uptick in housing aids underwater owners

Published Saturday, Nov. 24, 2012

After the housing bubble burst, tens of thousands of people across the Sacramento region were trapped in homes worth less than they owed, with experts predicting it could be many years before they recovered their lost equity.

In the past six months, however, rising prices have substantially reduced negative equity in the region, real estate tracking firm Zillow said in a recent report.

Today, nearly 5,000 underwater homeowners are nearing the point where their home values exceed their loan balances.

If prices continue to rise next year, as Zillow and others predict, an increasing number of area residents will be able to sell their homes without harming their credit scores through short sales, in which lenders take less than what is owed.

Some have already taken advantage of their newfound freedom.

“It was a miracle from God,” said Leisha Aitken, who cleared her loan, paid her real estate agent and walked away with money to rent an apartment after she sold her 2,100-square-foot home in Folsom’s Empire Ranch in September.

Aitken, a pharmacist, found herself out of work earlier this year and struggled with her $2,800 monthly mortgage payment. She was sure she would have to do a short sale and put a major strike on her credit rating.

Then she met with agent Gillian Long, of Intero Real Estate Services’ Folsom Lake office. The two decided to test the fast-changing market and push the asking price above $400,000 – enough to pay off Aitken’s $373,000 loan balance and cover commissions and moving expenses. The house sold quickly for $400,000, or about $191 a square foot, higher than comparable sales in recent months.

“Gillian said if I had called her a couple of months earlier, I would have had to do a short sale,” said Aitken, who has a new job and is hoping to buy a condominium. “It was a good feeling to sell that house and get out. I never want another mortgage payment like that again.”

A major factor in Aitken’s favor was that she never sank too far underwater on her home loan. Even at the bottom of the market in January she owed only about 10 percent more than her home was worth. Thousands of others are in similar situations.

Almost half of area homeowners – nearly 168,000 households – remain upside-down on their mortgages to varying degrees. The total amount of negative equity in the Sacramento region is nearly $17 billion, according to Zillow.

Some homeowners are much closer to breaking the surface than others. About 53,000 homeowners across the region are underwater by 20 percent or less, Zillow estimates. About 9,000 owe less than 10 percent more than their homes are worth. And about half that number, 4,770, owe less than 5 percent more than their homes’ value.

That last group is “extremely close to being in positive equity territory,” said Zillow spokeswoman Camille Salama.

The Seattle-based firm, among the more conservative of forecasters, predicts home prices in the Sacramento region will increase by about 6 percent through the third quarter of 2013.

“As home values continue to rise in the Sacramento area there will be homeowners who will switch from being underwater to above water,” said Svenja Gudell, Zillow senior economist.

When that happens, she said, a larger number of traditional home sales could come on the market.

In recent years, foreclosures and short sales have made up the bulk of the market, and investors have been the major buyers. Having families buy and sell homes in the traditional manner would help restore a sense of normalcy to the market, she said.

And those who have positive equity will start spending again on home upgrades, she said. “It has to do with confidence and seeing return on investment,” she said.

Economist Jeffrey Michael, director of the University of the Pacific’s Business Forecasting Center in Stockton, said he agrees that “the prospect of those folks (who are only slightly underwater) getting above water in the next year or two is pretty good.” But he said he was skeptical they would help drive the housing market with new purchases.

Those who are newly above water will “be able to sell their house,” he said, but they “won’t have a ton of equity.” Only those who can bring other sources of cash to the table can buy another house, he said.

Local real estate professionals take a more optimistic view.

Pat Shea, president of Lyon Real Estate in Sacramento, said he thinks there is pent-up demand from people who have been in their homes for years and need more room to accommodate growing families or less room because their children have grown up.

Many will be eager to sell, and even if they can manage only a small down payment, will look to take advantage of today’s low prices and interest rates.

“You know there are some people itching to move up, down or sideways,” he said. “When they can do it, they will.”

© Copyright The Sacramento Bee. All rights reserved.

 

6W24ABOVEWATER_Jump

 

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More Cash Sales, Shrinking Time on Market Show Changing Buyer Dynamics

Media Contact: Sara Wiskerchen / 202-383-1013 / Email

ORLANDO (November 10, 2012) – All-cash buyers have surged since the housing downturn while the typical amount of time it takes to sell a home is shrinking, revealing the changing dynamics of today’s home buyers and sellers.

Academic experts took a closer look at cash buyers and how time-on-market impacts home sales during the “Changing Dynamics of Recent Home Buyers and Sellers” session today at the 2012 Realtors® Conference and Expo. Funding for the research was provided by the REALTOR® University Center for Real Estate Studies.

“We’ve seen a tremendous increase in cash buyers since the housing downturn that we haven’t seen before in history,” said Lawrence Yun, chief economist of the National Association of Realtors®. Yun said a decade ago all-cash home purchases were less than 10 percent of the market but have increased steadily since 2008, to as much as 30 percent of sales.

Yun said the increase in more buyers paying cash for real estate reflected tight lending conditions and an increase in investor sales, which account for the bulk of cash sales. Increases in the number of international buyers, who often have financing difficulties when purchasing a home in the U.S., are also adding to the rise in cash sales. NAR research shows that 62 percent of international purchases were all cash; the percentage has continually increased since 2007.

Recent NAR research on down payment sources may offer insights into how cash buyers are receiving funds for home purchases. According the 2012 NAR Home Buyers and Sellers Profile, 40 percent of repeat buyers use the proceeds from the sale of their primary residence as a source of down payment, but downsizing boomers may have enough equity left from their home sale to pay all cash for their next purchase. Yun also noted that one in 10 buyers rely on proceeds from the sale of stocks or 401K disbursements for down payments; those with stable jobs and who saw investment gains in recent years may be using those cash funds to buy a home outright rather than financing the purchase.

Dr. Grant Ian Thrall, president of the American Real Estate Society, agreed that cash sales have increased dramatically in recent years. Thrall spoke at the session and conducted an in-depth market analysis to gain greater insights into cash buyers.

“Research shows a bias toward cash sales for newer and lower priced homes,” Thrall said. “Many of those sales are occurring within the first 60 days that the home is on the market, and more than half sold within the first 120 days.”

Thomas Springer, professor of Finance and Real Estate at Clemson University, discussed how time-on-market responds to employment changes and varies with shifting market and economic conditions. Springer analyzed market data from more than two dozen metro areas.  His findings indicate that, at the property level, time-on-market is a function of property characteristics, price and market factors; however, at market level, time-on-market is a function of local, national and global economic and market factors.

Springer determined that time-on-market is a possible indicator of market conditions or risk and that in a vibrant market, time-on-market is shorter, whereas distressed markets often have a longer average time-on-market.

Yun said that tightened inventory conditions are also impacting time-on-market, which has steadily decreased nationally since the start of the year, as are home buyers’ search processes.

“Tightened inventories in some places mean homes are selling more quickly and reducing time-on-market,” Yun said. “Our research shows that last year, home buyers saw 10 homes before buying, down from 12 the year before, and more than half of buyers reported that finding the right home was the hardest part of the home search process.”

The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

Who said Real Estate isn’t a good investment?

Sacramento‘s Real Estate Market has been one of the Nation’s worst hit areas with Foreclosures and Short Sales.   It appears that the bottom of the market came and went overnight and home prices are on the increase again.   In the event you missed this article in the Sacramento Bee check it out on who’s buying up a lot of the local Real Estate.

Article:

BIG INVESTMENT FIRM BUYS HUNDREDS OF HOUSES IN SACRAMENTO AREA

 

 

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Six Mistakes Investors Make

Investing in real estate right now can be surprisingly profitable as rents are on the increase in many areas due to the number of people losing their homes to foreclosures or doing a Short Sale of their homes. 

Remember that owning rental property is time consuming, expensive, challenging, and many investors lose money. 

Mistake 1:  Confusing a cheap deal for a good deal – You can buy homes at a low price but that doesn’t mean you can rent them out.  They usually aren’t any more appealing to rents than they are to buyers.  Also less-desirable school districts may hamper renting your property. 

Mistake 2:  Overlooking key costs – Knowing potential rent is not enough.  You should also factor in closing costs 3-6%, costs to fix up the place and maintain it, and your holding costs.

 Mistake 3:  Forgetting that time is money – You lose money when your home is empty, whether you are trying to rent it, in between tenants or painting.  You may be better off accepting a lower rent than waiting for a higher-paying tenant. 

Mistake 4:  Assuming you will sit back and watch the rent roll in – You are a rent collector and sometimes tenants lose their jobs and stop paying rent.  Evicting them can take several weeks without rental income coming in. 

Mistake 5:  Underestimating repair costs – Carpet in rentals typically must be replaced every five years and you may have to repaint after every tenant.  The National Association of Residential Property Managers suggests setting aside six months of expenses so that you will have funds if a major repair is needed. 

Mistake 6:  Assuming that owning a rental is the same as owning a home – You might put up with flaws in a home that a renter won’t tolerate.  A property manager can handle most headaches, but you should expect to pay up to a month of rent for finding and screening tenants and up to 10% of the monthly rent for management fees.

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